Category: News

Big Boy G Scale Backyard Railroad

How dedicated can you get to Big Boy?

G Scale Railroad – the letter G is short for garden and this layout does exactly that! It goes through the garden, over and under fences, and around curves using the articulated front truck just like the real thing.

This layout is truly a labor of love while trying to keep the backyard as functional as possible including the garden!

The G scale (gauge) of these model railroad tracks:

  1. Gauge One scaled at 1:32 to model standard gauge trains in real life at 4 ft 8 1/2 inches
  2. G Scale / G Gauge 45mm (1.772 inches)
  3. H Scale at 1:24 used to model narrow gauge railroads at 3 ft 6 inches.
  4. Our eyes are glued to this fantastic layout!

    If you have or are a backyard rail enthusiast, please let us know your comments!

    The post Big Boy G Scale Backyard Railroad appeared first on Train Fanatics.

    Source: Train Fanatics

Updated: April 5, 2020 — 5:53 pm

Sumpter Valley Heisler #3 And Mikado #19

Sumpter Valley Railroad’s Heisler #3 wood burning steam locomotive.

The Sumpter Valley Railroad in eastern Oregon was originally nicknamed the “stump dodger line”. The reason for the nickname is that the Sumpter Valley Railroad had so many twists and curves, it seemed to the builders they were always dodging tree stumps!

Built back in 1890 to serve the logging industry, the 3 foot narrow gauge line is now a heritage operation with an original Heisler-type wood burning steam locomotive #3 and the 1920 ALCO built #19 Mikado 2-8-2 Locomotive.

The line currently is about 5 miles long and provides some of the best scenery between Sumpter and McEwen, Oregon.

Let us know if you have ever had the chance to take a ride on this magnificent heritage railroad! We would love to hear about your experience!

The post Sumpter Valley Heisler #3 And Mikado #19 appeared first on Train Fanatics.

Source: Train Fanatics

Updated: April 5, 2020 — 4:31 pm

Cutting Through the Weeds – Bad Tracks

Ambling at a slower speed, the Santa Fe #5 works her way through the brush on rails that were laid as far back as 1890!

The Maumee & Western Railroad (MAW) was originally built as a Class III shortline railroad over swamp ground.

As you can see, the track is in terrible shape and has not had maintenance for over 60 years. The previous owners put no money into the line. It is now under the ownership of Pioneer Railcorp Company who are slowly replacing decayed cross ties and broken rails over 51 miles of track.

Derails are a common occurrence on this stretch of track!

Let us know if you live near by or have seen trains and engines rumbling down these tracks. We would love to hear your thoughts!

The post Cutting Through the Weeds – Bad Tracks appeared first on Train Fanatics.

Source: Train Fanatics

Updated: April 5, 2020 — 4:07 pm

How Does It Long It Takes A Train To Stop?

Staged collision shows that the train always wins!

Kiwi Rail’s Safetrack demonstration clearly shows the speed and impact forces that are brought to bear on anything that gets in the way of a train. The slow motion motion replays illustrate graphically how much time it takes for the train to come to a complete stop.

The DXB 5143 diesel locomotive and DC 4260 were used because they run the gauge rail of 3 foot 6 inches which is the standard gauge of Kiwi Rail in New Zealand.

Some quick facts about DXB & DC 4260:

  • Builder – General Electric Diesel- US and Canada
  • combined locomotive weights of 360,000 lbs
  • Top speeds of 60 -65 Mph
  • Gauge 3 feet 6 inches
  • Purpose – hauling freight
  • Combined tractive effort 81,000 pounds

Let us know if you have had the opportunity any demonstrations up close. We would love to hear about your experience!

The post How Does It Long It Takes A Train To Stop? appeared first on Train Fanatics.

Source: Train Fanatics

UP Big Boy 4014 & UP 844 Heading Out

UP #4014 and UP #844 building up steam simultaneously!

While getting ready to leave Cheyenne, Wyoming, as part of their inaugural run together, Big Boy #4014 and UP #844 are building up to 300 psi in the boiler.

Of the 25 Big Boys that were built, all but 8 were scrapped, unfortunately.

h3>Some Quick Facts about UP #844

  • Rail Line: Union Pacific
  • Power type: 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive FEF-3 class Northern
  • Builder: American Locomotive Company
  • Locomotive and tender weight: 907,890 lbs
  • Driver diameters – 80 inches!
  • Tractive effort: 63,750 lbf
  • MAX SPEED – 120 MPH !

Quick Facts about UP Big Boy 4014

  • Rail Line: Union Pacific
  • Driver diameters:-68 inches
  • Power type: 4-8-8-4 Steam Locomotive Class 4000
  • Builder: American Locomotive Company 1941
  • Coal Consumption: 22,000 lbs per hour (converted to oil)
  • Locomotive and tender weight: 1,250,000 lbs
  • Max Speed: 80 MPH !

Let us know if you have seen these two locomotives in person. We would love to hear about your experience!

The post UP Big Boy 4014 & UP 844 Heading Out appeared first on Train Fanatics.

Source: Train Fanatics

Updated: April 3, 2020 — 6:38 pm

J611 – Just Listen To The Stack Talk

J 611 lets you know she is coming!

J611 is seen here climbing the 1.5% grade on Christianburg Hill in Virginia.

Hauling 21 cars and 2 tenders on rain soaked tracks, J 611 is using her full 5200 horsepower and 80,000 lbf tractive effort.

You can hear her strain as she flexes her muscles at maximum steam pressure. A powerful machine, the J 611 boiler is rated at 300 psi. and could pull 15 cars at 110 miles per hour!

With a weight of 494,000 lbs., her 27×32 inch cylinders turn her 70 inch driver wheels, she handles these grades, no problem!

Some quick facts about Norfolk and Western’s J-Class #611

  • Manufacturer: Norfolk and Western Roanoake Shops
  • build date: 1950
  • Wheel alignment: 4-8-4
  • Drivers: 70 inches
  • Locomotive and tender weight combined: 872,600 lbs
  • Maximum speed: 110 MPH

Let us know if you have ever seen this magnificent machine rolling down the tracks. We would love to hear your comments!

The post J611 – Just Listen To The Stack Talk appeared first on Train Fanatics.

Source: Train Fanatics

Updated: April 3, 2020 — 2:39 pm