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Photo – Modeling Tip Monday – Let’s Get Growing! With all their action and detail, city scenes are hard to beat, but real railroads go through a lot of wide-open spaces across America. Much of the landscape is farmland, where you’ll find a wide range of regional and seasonal crops, offering some neat modeling ideas. Many of these are “row crops,” so called as they’re planted in straight lines side-by-side. Depending on where you live, you might see corn, soybeans, peanuts, and cotton planted this way. Not all of these rows look alike however, as some are wider than others to allow the plants room to spread out or provide room for cultivating and spraying equipment to get between valuable plants to control weeds. The color and size of the crops growing along your railroad can indicate a lot to even the most casual viewer. Lighter greens and shorter vegetation are common in the springtime. A dry season can impact the size and color, with smaller plants turning yellow or brown. While some crops are harvested before drying out to preserve nutrients, others are allowed to air dry, turning a darker brown or gold as the growing season comes to an end. Like the prototype, you’ll want to prepare your fields for planting first. This may involve simulating plowed furrows, and painting the surface a natural earth color, or applying ground covers to match soil conditions in your area. Next up, apply glue in rows and sprinkle on the appropriate color and size of foliage. You’ll also find a lot of ready-made items that can be installed quickly to produce great results. Don’t overlook the edges of your fields either, especially if they run along a railroad or highway right-of-way. Those spots are naturals for fences old or new, and the owners will need to add a culvert and gravel driveway as well as a gate for access. Whether tall and neglected, or carefully cut and well maintained, be sure to plant grass and/or weeds between those fences and the edge of the road or railroad too. What kinds of crops should you grow on your layout?

Modeling Tip Monday – Let’s Get Growing!

With all their action and detail, city scenes are hard to beat, but real railroads go through a lot of wide-open spaces across America. …read more

Source:: <a href=https://www.facebook.com/WalthersTrains/photos/a.158802424420.113866.147522319420/10155677762184421/?type=3 target="_blank" title="Photo – Modeling Tip Monday – Let’s Get Growing!

With all their action and detail, city scenes are hard to beat, but real railroads go through a lot of wide-open spaces across America. Much of the landscape is farmland, where you’ll find a wide range of regional and seasonal crops, offering some neat modeling ideas.

Many of these are “row crops,” so called as they’re planted in straight lines side-by-side. Depending on where you live, you might see corn, soybeans, peanuts, and cotton planted this way. Not all of these rows look alike however, as some are wider than others to allow the plants room to spread out or provide room for cultivating and spraying equipment to get between valuable plants to control weeds.

The color and size of the crops growing along your railroad can indicate a lot to even the most casual viewer. Lighter greens and shorter vegetation are common in the springtime. A dry season can impact the size and color, with smaller plants turning yellow or brown. While some crops are harvested before drying out to preserve nutrients, others are allowed to air dry, turning a darker brown or gold as the growing season comes to an end.

Like the prototype, you’ll want to prepare your fields for planting first. This may involve simulating plowed furrows, and painting the surface a natural earth color, or applying ground covers to match soil conditions in your area. Next up, apply glue in rows and sprinkle on the appropriate color and size of foliage. You’ll also find a lot of ready-made items that can be installed quickly to produce great results.

Don’t overlook the edges of your fields either, especially if they run along a railroad or highway right-of-way. Those spots are naturals for fences old or new, and the owners will need to add a culvert and gravel driveway as well as a gate for access. Whether tall and neglected, or carefully cut and well maintained, be sure to plant grass and/or weeds between those fences and the edge of the road or railroad too.

What kinds of crops should you grow on your layout? If you’re modeling a specific part of the country, you can take a drive to find out what’s grown near you, and check online and local libraries, or your county agricultural agent’s office for more information.

Be sure to check out your Reference Book and walthers.com for everything from plowed fields to plants, along with figures, structures, vehicles, locos and freight cars to get those crops to distant markets!

https://www.walthers.com/harvest-corn-field-brown-kit-covers-3-15-16-x-3-15-16-quot-10-x-10cm” >FB-RSS feed for Walthers

Updated: July 24, 2017 — 11:00 am

High mark for TEUs at leading East Coast gateway. http://bit.ly/2usHLIs

High mark for TEUs at leading East Coast gateway.
http://bit.ly/2usHLIs

Record container traffic for Georgia ports in FY2017; six more cranes on order

The Georgia Ports Authority reported record results in …read more

Source:: <a href=http://bit.ly/2usHLIs target="_blank" title="High mark for TEUs at leading East Coast gateway.
http://bit.ly/2usHLIs” >FB-RSS feed for Railway Age

Updated: July 24, 2017 — 10:27 am

Genesee & Wyoming names new CEO for Australia unit.http://bit.ly/2v0mPvg

Genesee & Wyoming names new CEO for Australia unit.
http://bit.ly/2v0mPvg

Anderson joins Genesee & Wyoming Australia

Genesee & Wyoming Australia Pty Ltd (GWA) announced that Luke C. Anderson has been appointed chief …read more

Source:: <a href=http://bit.ly/2v0mPvg target="_blank" title="Genesee & Wyoming names new CEO for Australia unit.
http://bit.ly/2v0mPvg” >FB-RSS feed for Railway Age

Updated: July 24, 2017 — 10:26 am

Rapido is in the news…. in Bromsgrove, England!

Rapido is in the news…. in Bromsgrove, England!

Canadian bus enthusiast stops off at Wythall Transport Museum to launch his company’s first British model bus

Jason Shron, founder of the award-winning model manufacturer Rapido Trains Inc in Toronto, stopped off at the Chapel Lane museum to start the process of using 3D scanning to create the model.

Source: FB-RSS feed for Rapido Trains Inc.

Updated: July 24, 2017 — 9:19 am
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